The Kansas City Metropolitan Crime Commission

3100 Broadway Blvd Suite 226, Kansas City, MO 64111

​816-960-6800​

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OUR MISSION

"As a nationally recognized nonprofit, we advocate, develop strategies and operate innovative programs that bring people and public safety agencies together to power a safer, better Kansas City community."

OUR STORY

Organized in 1949 to investigate corruption, the Kansas City Metropolitan Crime Commission has become a model for ways to organize the struggle for greater public safety. At its inception, Kansas City businessman and civic leader E.M. Dodds pushed for the Crime Commission to cut down on "a rash of homicides, coupled with evidence of improved gambling conditions, hints of gangsterism, and increasing general lawlessness."

1949

The Crime Commission helped identify Kansas City's organized crime leaders in the 1970s, then documented successful prosecutions against the crime syndicate.

1970

1982

In 1982, the first anonymous calls began rolling into the Crime Commission-sponsored TIPS Hotline, and it has since become one of the three most successful Crime Stoppers programs worldwide, clearing over 25,000 felony cases.

1994

In 1994, the Metropolitan Community Service Program began beautifying and restoring KC neighborhoods by organizing cleanups by offenders ordered to serve the community as part of their sentences.

2003

Recognizing the need to support the families of fallen local heroes, the Crime Commission launched the Surviving Spouse And Family Endowment Fund (SAFE) in 2003, and has since provided no-strings-attached financial support to the families of local first responders killed in the line of duty.

2008

In 2008, the Crime Commission launched the Second Chance program for those who desire the tools to change their lives. Second Chance provides resources to instill change, significantly lowering the local recidivism rate.

2019

Today, a mere glance at news headlines makes it clear that it's more important than ever to support law enforcement efforts. The Crime Commission isn't on the outside looking in. Its community leaders and citizen volunteers hold monthly meetings with police chiefs and sheriffs across metropolitan Kansas City so they can enact concrete measures to support those who risk their lives to make our city a safer place.